Canada Goose online

The language that the Dothraki speak in Game of Thrones was created specifically for the show by linguist David J. Peterson. Peterson drew inspiration for the language from the description and words already created in the books as well as languages such as Turkish, Russian, Estonian, Inutitut and Swahili. Although many Game of Thrones viewers thought the language they were hearing was Arabic. However, it is a completely fictional language that has 3,163 words as of 2011, not all of which have been made public.

Peterson also created the Valyrian language and added a Schutean Compound to Dothraki after Dwight Schute learned the language on the television show The Office and used it in a unique new dialect that intrigued him. Martin actually based it on Hadrian’s Wall in Britain.Canada Goose online While the Great Wall of China protected the Chinese dynasties from Mongol hordes, Hadrian’s Wall protected Rome’s furthest boundary in Britain from the fierce Pict tribes.

11. King Joffery May Never Act Again

After his onscreen death on Game of Thrones, Jack Gleeson, the actor that played King Joffery, announced that his acting days are done. However, it’s not because he’s afraid as always being typecast as that horrible, cruel boy king, but rather because he just doesn’t enjoy it anymore.

“I started acting when I was eight, and really, really loved it,” Gleeson told a class at University College Dublin. “But I think when it became less of a recreation and more of a profession, it kind of put more pressure on the acting itself and made it a tiny bit less enjoyable.

Every prop in Game of Thrones is ridiculously detailed. Every book that gets onscreen time has at least 20 pages of actual details from the world of Game of Thrones done in authentic writing so the book’s reader can realistically flip through it. The majority of the swords, particularly the major named ones, are made from real steel by famous blacksmith, Hollywood prop designer and Youtube Man at Arms sensation Tony Sutton. Even the clothing, particularly the dresses, tell a story of their own. The set clothing designer quotes that Sansa’s wedding dress tells the story of how she went from Tully to Stark and became entangled with the Lannisters.

In all of Westeros and Essos, there is only one boat. As one of the most expensive television series’ ever to grace the small screen, Game of Thrones producers have to cut costs where they can to save for the good stuff. Every large boat seen in the series is really just the same boat done up in a different way. Daenerys’ ship from Qothor to Astapor, Stannis Baratheon’s flagship Fury and Davos Seaworth’s Black Bertha all the same ship.

In fact, in a touch of irony, when Emilia Clarke was filming in Morocco, it was too expensive to move the boat from its spot in Northern Ireland, so she was flown to Ireland for the day to film a singular scene on the boat, making it her first and only scene on the Ireland set.

20 best Beijing hotels

That amazing opening ceremony or Usain Bolt’s record breaking 100 meter run might be what much of the public still remembers, but for travelers there’s a more important legacy of Beijing’s Olympic Games party: hotel beds.

Thousands of rooms and beds, from big chain luxury operations to chic courtyard hostels, are left unfilled in the city.

Whether you want to bathe like an emperor in the central business district (CBD) or drop a rucksack an alleyway near the Forbidden City, Beijing has got you covered in covers.

The Opposite House ()Marble bathrooms are so last century.

Opened in 2008, this six story, glass walled, 99 room boutique hotelis the city’s hippest address. The work of Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, it shows off Beijing’s Olympic commitment to design and style.

White rooms have a breezy, yoga studio aesthetic. Even the bath is wooden.

Downstairs you’ll find a stainless steel pool like something from Doctor Evil’s lair, though with no piranhas and Bei, one of Beijing’s finest restaurants. The hotel even has its own nightclub, Punk.

In the middle of a large shopping and dining complex, The Opposite House is in a good setting for night owls.

Rising like a steel mast over Beijing’s CBD, the 81 story, 330 meter China World Tower 3 (the city’s tallest building) hosts Shangri La’s Summit Wing hotel on its uppermost floors (64th 80th floor).

Bill Gates books a suite here when he’s in town,http://www.icanadagoosereview.top/ but even the standard rooms measure in at an impressive 55 square meters, with Narnia sized wardrobes and a tub big enough for one on one water polo.

This slick business hotel has decorative Oriental flourishes, giant feather pillows and jaw dropping vistas, smog permitting.

Since opening in 2010, Atmosphere Bar on the 80th floor has garnered a following for its views of the bright lights of CBD.

The 25 meter infinity pool on the 78th floor yup, it’s like swimming in the sky might well be the highlight of your stay.

A bit faded, the hotel still exudes class from every glittering chandelier and four poster bed.

Rooms in south facing Block “B” (the original section of the hotel) overlooking Chang’an Jie are prime real estate.

Expect all the fawning and comforts “Aman junkies” take for granted: huge bathrooms, period furnishings, a packed program of tours and cultural events and seriously fine dining at Naoki Restaurant, which serves Japanese kaisekicuisine.

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Georgia transportation highlights

Georgia transportation is deeply linked with state’s economic history; the growth of our state has been shaped by the maintenance and expansion of transportation systems that include highways, railroads, ports, and air travel.  Today, Georgia is home to one of the world’s busiest airports, Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, as well as one of America’s fastest-growing ports in Savannah; the state is also a regional hub for road and rail travel.  For a complete list of DLG collections with significant content pertaining to transportation in Georgia, see http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/Topics/Transportation.html. Here are some highlights from those collections.

Ox team, 1899. Two boys on a cart loaded with wood, pulled by two oxen. Posed on a road path with a railroad track in the foreground. Scene of Judge H.B. Spooner's farm in Faceville, Decatur County, Georgia.
Ox team, 1899. Two boys on a cart loaded with wood, pulled by two oxen. Posed on a road path with a railroad track in the foreground. Scene of Judge H.B. Spooner’s farm in Faceville, Decatur County, Georgia.

The photograph above of two African American boys riding a cart led by two oxen represents Georgia rural transportation at the turn of the century; the photograph indicates that travel in rural areas incorporated modern technology (seen in the railroad tracks at the foreground of the photograph) along with animal-powered farm vehicles.

 

Atlanta, old scene: Early automobile, 1910-1919
Atlanta, old scene: Early automobile, 1910-1919.

The photograph above is of an early automobile being driven on an unpaved road, sometime between 1910 and 1919. Today, Georgia drivers can traverse more than 117,000 miles of public roads, which include county roads, state highways, city streets, and interstate highways.  These roads are maintained by the Georgia Department of Transportation with a combination of funds raised from automobile fuel taxes, state taxes, and federal funding.  The photograph below is a still shot from a 1964 newsfilm clip of a driving safety exposition.

Exposition on driving safety, 1964
Exposition on driving safety, 1964.

 

A Van Depoele system car of the early 1890's rolls past Atlanta's Southern Medical College on the Inman Park line of the Atlanta and Edgewood Street Railroad.
A Van Depoele system car of the early 1890s rolls past Atlanta’s Southern Medical College on the Inman Park line of the Atlanta and Edgewood Street Railroad.

Railroads were first built in Georgia during the 1830s. Atlanta, which was well-situated for rail transport, became a focal point of railroad travel and commerce for the entire Southeast; during the Civil War, the city was seized by Union forces to ensure that supplies could not be sent to Confederate troops by rail. After the Civil War, new railroad lines were built and incorporated into larger rail systems, such as the Central of Georgia, Southern Railway, the Atlantic Coast Line, and the Seaboard Air Line Railway. Some of these rail systems are described in the publication A History of Transportation in the Eastern Cotton Belt to 1860, by Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, available as part of the Georgia-related Publications from the Hathi Trust Digital Library collection. Rail travel declined in popularity during the 1920s, as automobile and road travel became more convenient and affordable for both passenger and freight transport. Today, passenger service through Georgia is represented in two Amtrak routes, and freight is transported across the state by two carriers: CSX and Norfolk Southern across approximately 5,000 miles of railroad tracks. The photograph above includes a local passenger street rail car from the early 1890s that was part of the Atlanta and Edgewood Street Railroad ; the photograph below shows a rail-to-dock cargo connection at a Savannah port in 1930.

 

Savannah, ca. 1930. View of dock area. Warehouses seen in the background. In the foreground are railroad connections needed to connect with the water transportation available at Savannah.
Savannah, ca. 1930. View of dock area. Warehouses seen in the background. In the foreground are railroad connections needed to connect with the water transportation available at Savannah.

Many of Georgia’s first cities were built based upon their proximity to water transportation. Travel by canal and river ensured that materials grown or processed inland could be carried out to coastal deep-water cargo facilities of Savannah and Brunswick.  Although railroads became a more popular method of transporting cargo at the turn of the twentieth century, barge transportation was developed and incentivized during the mid-20th century in inland port cities such as Bainbridge (around 1957) and Columbus (around 1961) to ensure the efficient travel of commodities. The photograph below features a steamboat carrying bales of cotton down the Ocmulgee River in 1897.

 

Hawkinsville, 1897. The steamboat, the "City of Hawkinsville," prepares to leave for its maiden trip transporting bales of cotton on the Ocmulgee River.
Hawkinsville, 1897. The steamboat, the “City of Hawkinsville,” prepares to leave for its maiden trip transporting bales of cotton on the Ocmulgee River.

Ben Epps became Georgia’s first aviator when he flew his first plane in Athens in 1907. More than one hundred years later, Georgia hosts one of the world’s busiest airports, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, one of 107 public use airports across the state.  Many of Georgia’s public use airports were formerly military air bases used during World War II that were ultimately turned over to city and county governments. Georgia’s vibrant air transportation industry attracts commercial activity from outside of the state, and serves many millions of passengers annually. The photographs below include an airplane built by Ben Epps, and a naval airship squadron parked inside of an air station hangar in Glynn County.

A B.T. Epps Plane built in 1916.
A B.T. Epps Plane built in 1916.

 

Airship Squadron ZP2 in Hangar #1 at Glynco Naval Air Station, ca. 1942. Glynco Naval Air Station was decommissioned as a military facility in 1974. It was reopened as a civilian airport in 1975.
Airship Squadron ZP2 in Hangar #1 at Glynco Naval Air Station, ca. 1942. Glynco Naval Air Station was decommissioned as a military facility in 1974. It was reopened as a civilian airport in 1975.

MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority), the ninth largest mass transit system in the United States, provides rail and bus service to the metropolitan Atlanta area. The photographs below show a predecessor of modern bus transportation in an open passenger bus from approximately 1914-1915, and a shot of a MARTA train traveling by the airport.

Photograph of open passenger bus in front of J. William Lee, Undertaker & Livery, Georgia, ca. 1914-1915
Photograph of open passenger bus in front of J. William Lee, Undertaker & Livery, Georgia, ca. 1914-1915.

 

MARTA rail service to the airport, 1990.
MARTA rail service to the airport, 1990.

 

Numerous collections also show transportation’s role in Georgia recreational life. Several recreational shots include: an 1897 photograph of a group of Atlanta bicyclists gathered around their bicycles, a photo of a young boy riding a miniature motorcycle in 1948, and a still from an international automobile show.

 

View of a group of bicyclists standing with their bicycles in front of the residence of Atlanta contractor William Bensel at 66 East Ellis Street, between Ivy Street and Courtland Street in Atlanta, Georgia, 1897.
View of a group of bicyclists standing with their bicycles in front of the residence of Atlanta contractor William Bensel at 66 East Ellis Street, between Ivy Street and Courtland Street in Atlanta, Georgia, 1897.
Teddy Edwards, son of the owner of the Indian Motorcycles franchise in Atlanta, is shown, 1948.
Teddy Edwards, son of the owner of the Indian Motorcycles franchise in Atlanta, is shown, 1948.
A look at cars on display at international automobile show, no date.
A look at cars on display at international automobile show, no date.

Transportation is an integral part of Georgia’s industrial and recreational life; highways, railroads, ports, mass transit, and air travel have helped secure Georgia’s role as a national and international commercial center.  The state’s growth and prosperity is due in large part to its success in finding ways to innovatively move people and goods across the state, and around the world.

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