The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is Now Available

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the availability of a new online resource: The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive

http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/sgnewspapers

The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive provides online access to six newspaper titles published in four south Georgia cities (Albany, Americus, Thomasville, and Valdosta) from 1845 to 1922. Consisting of over 81,000 newspaper pages, the archive provides historical images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date.

The archive includes the following south Georgia newspaper titles: the Albany News (1870-1883), the Albany Patriot (1845-1866), the Americus Times Recorder (1881-1921), the Sumter Republican (1870-1885), the Thomasville Times Enterprise (1873-1922), and the Valdosta Times (1908-1912). The Digital Library of Georgia will add additional titles from the region over time.

The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia as part of the Georgia HomePLACE initiative. The project is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Other newspaper archives available through the Digital Library of Georgia include the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive (1847-1922), the Macon Telegraph Archive (1826-1908), the Athens Historic Newspapers Archive (1827-1922), the Columbus Enquirer Archive (1828-1890), the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive (1808-1920), the Southern Israelite Archive (1929-1986), and the Red and Black Archive (1893-2006). These archives can be accessed at http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/MediaTypes/Newspapers.html

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The Godfather of Soul

On James Brown’s birthday, we highlight four places to find the Godfather of Soul in the Digital Library of Georgia (and one YouTube bonus):

1. The New Georgia Encyclopedia – Don’t know much about James Brown? This is a good place to start. Although he was born in Barnwell, South Carolina, he was a Georgian through and through. He spent most of his life in and around Augusta, Georgia, where a street is named for him and a statue stands in his honor. The image below is included in the article courtesy of the Atlanta University Center, Robert W. Woodruff Library Archives.

2. The Red and Black Newspaper Archive – Included here is an article from the April 30, 1968 issue of the Red & Black (the University of Georgia’s student newspaper) announcing a benefit concert he held in Athens to benefit underpriveleged children. Can you imagine seeing Soul Brother Number One for the ticket price of only $3.50? What a deal! There are many other news articles related to James Brown in the archive and can be searched by keyword.

3. Georgia Government Publications – This is a December 28, 2006 press release from Georgia governor Sonny Perdue regarding the death of James Brown, who had passed away a few days earlier on Christmas.

4. African American Funeral Programs from the East Central Georgia Regional Library – James Brown’s funeral was held in the James Brown Arena in Augusta, Georgia and was officiated by the Reverend Al Sharpton. The program includes images, an obituary, an order of service, and even a list of his many sayings including: “I’d rather die on my feet than live on my knees.”

5. James Brown YouTube Concert Clip – They don’t call him the Hardest Working Man in Show Business for nothing. Check out this clip of him performing Good Foot in concert in the early 1970s. It’ll blow your mind.

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