Public Information Office–Photographs, 1948-2000, from the City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives

The City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives has recently made a new collection available through its online Digital Image Catalog: Public Information Office–Photographs, 1948-2000.

This collection contains digitized photographs, slides, negatives, and manuscript material maintained by the city of Savannah’s Public Information Office, and document city-sponsored services, programs, and significant city events. There are also photographs of politicians and employees of city bureaus.

Cpl. K.R. Porter with RC Robot Patrol Car. City of Savannah, Public Information Office. Courtesy of City of Savannah, Research Library & Municipal Archives.
Cpl. K.R. Porter with RC Robot Patrol Car. City of Savannah, Public Information Office. Courtesy of City of Savannah, Research Library & Municipal Archives.

Images in the collection were used in both internal publications that included reports, newsletters, and identification materials, and promotional materials that advertised city services and programs. There are numerous images of Savannah city buildings that include City Hall, the Broughton Municipal Building, and the Civic Center, and other locations that include parks, street scenes, and historical structures.

We hope that you visit this collection and congratulate the City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives for providing another informative online resource.

Share

New Collections from City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives

Resolution regarding civil rights marches in the city of Savannah recorded in the Mayor's Speeches File Books for Savannah, Georgia, 1963
Resolution regarding civil rights marches in the city of Savannah recorded in the Mayor’s Speeches File Books for Savannah, Georgia, 1963

 

We are pleased to announce new collections with lots of new content from the City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives.

These new collections include:

Luciana Spracher, the library and archives director for the City of Savannah, Research Library and Municipal Archives, comments on the breadth of resources available: “For a municipal government, we have a very robust archival program, probably very fitting for a city of Savannah’s historical nature, and I think a lot of people will generally be surprised by how much we have, whether it is records on individuals, businesses, properties, or government growth and activities, in general.”

She adds: “We are particularly excited to share the oral history collections digitally.  Prior to this we did not have a good way to allow individuals to listen to the audio recordings and I think this new access will increase their use and appreciation.  I am also excited that we are sharing twentieth century collections and history with our citizens and users.  We have previously had a strong focus on nineteenth century records, but we are increasingly seeing where we need to start addressing gaps in our twentieth century records, and researchers are increasingly interested in studying twentieth century events and issues.

Now that these collections are available in the Digital Library of Georgia and the Digital Public Library of America, Spracher is eager to reach new researchers: “Our greatest hope for our collections through DLG and DPLA is that this will increase access and awareness.  We hope that new audiences will be introduced to them that may never have considered the City of Savannah as a source on certain topics.  I’m always excited when our records are used in ways that we never could have anticipated or hoped for.”

We hope that you take the time to explore these new collections, and learn more about how the twentieth century has shaped Savannah’s modern history.

Share