Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) awards six Competitive Digitization service grants to Georgia cultural heritage institutions across the state

Six institutions are recipients of the fifth set of service grants awarded in a program intended to broaden partner participation in the DLG. The DLG solicited proposals for historic digitization projects in a statewide call, and applicants submitted proposals for projects with a cost of up to $7,500.00 The projects will be administered by DLG staff who will perform digitization and descriptive services on textual (not including newspapers), graphic, and audio-visual materials. This subgranting program was presented the 2018 Award for Excellence in Archival Program Development by a State Institution by the Georgia Historical Records Advisory Council (GHRAC).

The recipients and their projects include:

  • Columbia Theological Seminary (Decatur, Ga.)

Digitization of the Joseph R. Wilson papers, late 1800s (containing the sermons of Joseph Ruggles Wilson, the pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Augusta from 1858-1870); John Newton Waddel papers, 1821-1881 (materials belonging to John Newton Waddel (1812-1885) and his father Moses Waddel (1770-1840), both Georgia Presbyterian ministers and educators); and the Presbyterian Church in the U.S. Presbytery of Hopewell minutes, 1797-1866 (minutes from Georgia’s first Presbytery belonging to the Presbyterian Church from the period following the Revolutionary War through the Civil War).

  • Dougherty County Public Library (Albany, Ga.)

Digitization of city directories for Albany, Georgia, dating from 1922-1949.

  • Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum (Atlanta, Ga.)

Description of archival documents that highlight notable events and accomplishments during Jimmy Carter’s presidential administration from 1977-1981 that include the Camp David Accords (1978), the hostage crisis in Iran (1979-1981), the Panama Canal Treaties (1977-1978), the president’s daily diary (1977-1981), presidential directives (1977-1981), presidential review memoranda (1977-1979), and legislation towards the progression of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

  • National Civil War Naval Museum (Columbus, Ga.)

Digitization of a ledger from the James H. Warner Collection containing correspondence from Warner, commander and superintendent of the Confederate States Naval Iron Works (sometimes referred to as the Columbus Iron Works) which operated from 1862-1865. The ledger also includes entries as late as 1866 as Warner worked with the United States Navy in turning over naval equipment to the United States government.

  • University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library (Athens, Ga.)

Digitization of Sanborn fire insurance maps produced in 1923 for 21 Georgia towns and cities in 17 counties.

  • Valdosta State University Archives and Special Collections (Valdosta, Ga.)

Digitization of Georgia deeds and plats representing southeastern and south Georgia counties(including Camden, Glynn, Wayne, Brantley, Ware, and Worth counties) dating from the 1700s-1899.

Preference in the selection process was given to proposals from institutions that had not yet collaborated with the DLG. Dougherty County Public Library and the National Civil War Naval Museum are both new partners for the DLG. Sheila McAlister, director of the Digital Library of Georgia, notes: “Since the start of DLG’s subgranting program in 2016, we’ve funded 26 projects and added 10 new partners. Documenting the entire state, the collections illuminate the lives of Georgia’s African-American, LGBTQ, and Asian-American communities, as well as the state’s educational, political, cultural and industrial past.”

About Columbia Theological Seminary

Columbia Theological Seminary exists to educate and nurture faithful, imaginative, and effective leaders for the sake of the church and the world. It is an educational institution of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and a community of theological inquiry, leadership development, and formation for ministry in the service of the church of Jesus Christ. Visit https://www.ctsnet.edu/

About Dougherty County Public Library

The Dougherty County Public Library’s mission is to select, assemble and administer organized collections of educational and recreational library materials; to serve the community as a center of reliable information and a place where inquiring minds may encounter original, unorthodox, or critical ideas in our society; to provide opportunities and encouragement for individuals to continue their educations; to supplement and help formal education programs; to seek, continually, to identify community needs; to support civic groups, cultural activities, or cooperate with other agencies as they work for community good; to maintain and disseminate public information encouraging to individuals to better use the libraries as well as to contribute to the field of professional librarianship; to enhance interest and research in local history; and to provide opportunity for substantive recreational and constructive use of leisure time through the use of literature, music, films, and other forms. Visit http://docolib.org/

About the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta, Georgia houses U.S. President Jimmy Carter’s papers and other material relating to the Carter Administration and the Carter family’s life. Visit https://www.jimmycarterlibrary.gov/

About the National Civil War Naval Museum

The National Civil War Naval Museum houses the largest surviving Confederate warship, the CSS Jackson, as well as the wreckage of the CSS Chattahoochee, and the largest collection of Civil War Naval-related flags on display in the country. Their timeline exhibit shows naval events and features many of the museum’s most rare artifacts, such as the uniform coat of Captain Catesby Jones and Admiral Farragut’s two-star hat insignia. The museum hosts a range of events throughout the year with an emphasis on museum theatre and historic character interpretation. Additionally, there are living history events, tours, cannon firings, weapons demonstrations, local history projects, and more. Visit https://www.portcolumbus.org/

About the University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library

The University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library (MAGIL)’s mission is to provide bibliographic, physical, and intellectual access to cartographic and government information in all formats. The UGA Libraries serves as Georgia’s regional depository for documents published by the Federal government as well as the official depository for documents published by the State of Georgia. Its collections include select international and United Nations documents. Cartographic resources include maps, aerial photography and remote sensed imagery, atlases, digital spatial data, and reference materials, with a particular emphasis on the State of Georgia. Visit https://www.libs.uga.edu/magil

About Valdosta State University Archives and Special Collections

The VSU Archives and Special Collections supports the University’s commitment to scholarly and creative work, enhances instructional effectiveness, encourages faculty scholarly pursuits, and supports research in selective areas of institutional strength focused on regional need by collecting, preserving, and providing access to records of enduring historical value documenting the history and development of VSU and the surrounding South Georgia region and in support of VSU curriculum. Visit https://www.valdosta.edu/academics/library/depts/archives-and-special-collections/

About the Digital Library of Georgia

Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia https://dlg.usg.edu/ is a GALILEO initiative that collaborates with Georgia’s libraries, archives, museums and other institutions of education and culture to provide access to key information resources on Georgia history, culture, and life. This primary mission is accomplished through the ongoing development, maintenance, and preservation of digital collections and online digital library resources. DLG also serves as Georgia’s service hub for the Digital Public Library of America and as the home of the Georgia Newspaper Project, the state’s historic newspaper microfilming project.

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Digitized newspapers from Atlanta University Center colleges now available on the Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive web site

The Spelman spotlight. (Atlanta , Georgia) 1957-1980, November 01, 1957, page 1

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce that, in conjunction with the Atlanta University Center (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library, several student newspapers from Spelman College, Atlanta Clark University, and Morris Brown College are now available for viewing at the Georgia Historic Newspapers web site at https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu. These resources, part of the “Our Story”: Digitizing Publications and Photographs of the Historically Black Atlanta University Center Institutions project, administered by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR)’s Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards program, which is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.    

When studying historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), patrons will find these newspapers beneficial for interdisciplinary examinations of African American achievement, African American leadership, and student life. These publications are significant, in that they were a means of self-expression for African American students to convey their opinions of college life and society within a forum that validated their thoughts and opinions. Digitization of these publications could significantly increase the scholarship written about the AUC, enable patrons to enhance the historical record, and contribute to a more comprehensive narrative through the representation of the under-documented.

Christine Wiseman, Head, Digital Services Department at Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library states: “Through the “Our Story” project, the AUC Woodruff Library has significantly expanded the breadth and depth of resources available about the history of the world’s largest consortium of HBCUs. Without support from CLIR and project partners, an initiative of this scale would not be possible. Making these student newspapers available online for students, scholars and the general public should contribute to the narrative and research on the history of African American higher education and its impact on society.”

The publications include:

The Spelman Spotlight

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn81304549/

The New Spelman Spotlight

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn81304580/

The Spotlight

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn81306945/

The BluePrint

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn81308021/

The Spelman Spotlight began as Spelman Reflections on February 1, 1956. In November of 1957, the masthead became Spelman Spotlight, but the design and editorial focus of the newspaper remained the same. The paper focused on matters concerning Spelman College and the Atlanta University Center. Within the pages of the Spotlight, one could find news related to faculty, student government, and campus life. The Spotlight briefly became the Spelman Bulletin for the November 1958 and March 1959 issues before returning to its previous title. In November of 1959, The Spotlight underwent a redesign. As the Spotlight settled into its new format, the topics it covered expanded beyond the range of Spelman College and included news related to the American Civil Rights Movement. In 2013, the Spotlight became the BluePrint. The BluePrint continues today as a student-run publication at Spelman College.

The Campus Mirror

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn38019897/

The Campus Mirror was first published in October 1924 as a monthly publication managed and edited by the students of Spelman College. The paper featured editorials, campus news, events, speeches, local advertisements featuring African American-owned businesses, and photographs of classes and organizations that document African American female leadership, and the experiences of African American women pursuing higher education from the 1920s to the 1950s.

In addition to its news coverage, literary works by students and advice for interviews or studying could be found in the Mirror‘s pages. A special commencement issue was published at the end of each academic year. These issues included photographs and covered the graduating and incoming classes, making the publication an important genealogical resource. The newspaper’s final issue circulated in May 1950 after 26 years of covering campus life.

  • Clark Atlanta University Panther

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn39724533/

The Panther was a monthly newspaper published by Clark College students during the academic year. In 1972, the student government chose Frank W. Johnson Jr. as editor-in-chief. Under Johnson’s leadership, the paper began to feature political and social issues beyond the confines of Clark College. In an April 1973 issue, Johnson announced that the Panther would expand coverage to include grassroots efforts in areas such as welfare, prison reform, black politics, police brutality, liberation movements in Africa, and other topics of the day. Also found those 1970s issues are calls for student submissions, guest editorials, and statements from school administration.

  • The Wolverine Observer

https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/lccn/sn54110460/

The Wolverine Observer was a student-run publication serving Morris Brown College and its community under the direction of Professor V. C. Clinch. By the 1960s, the Observer was a member of the Intercollegiate Press (later the Associated Collegiate Press) and was largely run by the students themselves. The Observer sought to report news of interest to the Morris Brown College community and featured student editorials throughout its pages.

Holly A. Smith, College Archivist, Women’s Research & Resource Center at Spelman College says: “The Campus Mirror is an amazing publication that many researchers outside of the Spelman community might not be aware of. It provides a rich and enlightening view of campus activities and news from the students’ perspective prior to the yearbook or the Spelman Spotlight, the long-running student newspaper. Making the Mirror accessible via the Digital Library of Georgia will increase awareness and use of this unique publication, and shed further light on the history of the college, the students, and the overall campus community.”

The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive web site provides access to these newspapers, enabling full-text searching and browsing by date and title. The site is compatible with all current browsers and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. The archive is free and open for public use.

About the Atlanta University Center (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library

The Atlanta University Center (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library serves as the center of the academic village for Clark Atlanta University, the Interdenominational Theological Center, Morehouse College, and Spelman College, providing the highest level of information resources and services in support of teaching and learning, scholarship and cultural preservation of the Atlanta University Center.]

About Spelman College

Spelman College, a historically Black college and a global leader in the education of women of African descent, is dedicated to academic excellence in the liberal arts and sciences and the intellectual, creative, ethical, and leadership development of its students. Spelman empowers the whole person to engage the many cultures of the world and inspires a commitment to positive social change.

About the Digital Library of Georgia

Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia https://dlg.usg.edu is a GALILEO initiative that collaborates with Georgia’s libraries, archives, museums, and other institutions of education and culture to provide access to key information resources on Georgia history, culture, and life. This primary mission is accomplished through the ongoing development, maintenance, and preservation of digital collections and online digital library resources. DLG also serves as Georgia’s service hub for the Digital Public Library of America and as the home of the Georgia Newspaper Project, the state’s historic newspaper microfilming project.

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