Explore Georgia Government Publications!

Members of the General Assembly of Georgia, Senate and House of Representatives, first session of the 1989-90 term (Picture Book), page 9.
Members of the General Assembly of Georgia, Senate and House of Representatives, first session of the 1989-90 term (Picture Book), page 9.

Have you explored Georgia Government Publications?

The Georgia Government Publications database (GGP)  was developed in 1996 as GALILEO’s first digital conversion initiative and redesigned in 2009. It serves as a comprehensive digital repository of more than 60,000 born-digital publications and scanned print documents produced by Georgia state agencies published from 1994 to the present.

Georgia state agencies are required by law to submit publications that they produce for the public to the official depository at the University of Georgia Libraries. These publications are all included in the GGP and include not only print and electronic formats but also posters, bookmarks, maps, videocassettes, CDs, and DVDs. Most of these documents are scanned images; however, with the passing of an amendment to the law (O.C.G.A. 20-5-2) in 2000 requiring state agencies to submit publications in electronic format, a greater percentage of searchable pdf files are included in the database and are noted as electronic text. As previously noted, most of the images in the Georgia Government Publications database are from scanned sources and are not full-text searchable. However, there are also many born digital documents with full-text searchability. These documents are noted in the database as electronic text.

In addition to archiving Georgia state publications from 1994 onward, the Georgia Government Publications database is currently adding pre-1994 serials on an ongoing basis; a list of those publications can be found at http://dlgmaint.galib.uga.edu/ggp/about/. Among the pre-1994 publications that have been added to the collection are the Picture Book, containing biographical information about Georgia’s state senators and state representatives (see a 1989 edition of the book here), and the Department of Education Annual Report, which has detailed textual and photographic information surveying the education system in Georgia back to 1871 (A 1976 annual report is available here). The Georgia Official and Statistical Register, 1923-1990 is also a project of the GGP; it contains brief biographical sketches of state elected officials, federal and state Congressional members, election statistics, and provides information about state agency organization and administration.

Two recent additions to the Georgia Government Publications database are:

The Georgia constitution (Article III, Section V, Paragraph I) requires that both the House of Representatives and Senate maintain journals of their proceedings. These publications are the official records of these legislative bodies, and are compiled and published following each legislative session. The journals include captions of bills and resolutions, votes, motions made by representatives and senators, reports of standing committees, and other applicable information.

Can I keep it?: a guide to Georgia laws, regulations and recommendations regarding non-domesticated animals as pets (Georgia. Dept. of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division, 2001).
Can I keep it?: a guide to Georgia laws, regulations and recommendations regarding non-domesticated animals as pets (Georgia. Dept. of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division, 2001).

The breadth and variety of resources available in the Georgia Government Publications database is substantial. Here is a small list of some of the types of publications from different departments or agencies within the Georgia state government that you can find:

We hope that you spend some time discovering the resources available in Georgia Government Publications!

 

Share

Pets for Christmas not a good idea?

Don’t fry a turkey indoors. Don’t give your child a BB gun (say it with me, “You’ll shoot your eye out, kid”). And if you are thinking about giving someone a pet for Christmas, well…not such a hot idea according to the Georgia Department of Agriculture. You can read their press release for yourself in our database of Georgia Government Publications.

Many and varied are the helpful tips put out by departments within Georgia’s government. This one in particular caught my eye as the holidays approach. It reads, at first, like a bucket of cold water thrown on the fiery hopes of children everywhere. And it is dispassionate in its assessment of pets as gifts–mildly alarmist even. “Returning home to find a new pet sick or in need of medical care is not the Christmas memory you’ll want to carry through the years.” No, indeed not.

That said, it is full of practical considerations that would benefit a considered holiday purchase. Does the person receiving this gift actually want a pet (what type of surprise would an iguana for your Grandma elicit?).  Will their interest in the pet outlast their interest in the Xbox? And remember, “A dog or cat is not like a sweater that you can return or stick in the back of the closet.”

So this holiday season, before you promise little Johnny a Rottweiler, take a minute to think it through with the Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Share