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50th Anniversary of the Selma-Montgomery March

2015 March 6
by Mandy Mastrovita
African American children with an American flag, probably during the Selma to Montgomery March. SSelma to Montgomery Rights March slide collection, Slide #2612, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, Montgomery, Alabama.

African American children with an American flag, probably during the Selma to Montgomery March. Selma to Montgomery Rights March slide collection, Slide #2612, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, Montgomery, Alabama.

March 7, 2015 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma-Montgomery March.

The Selma-Montgomery march was organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to protest local resistance to African American voter registration in Dallas County, Alabama.

Under the leadership of the SCLC’s Hosea Williams and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s John Lewis, a group of five hundred to six hundred demonstrators marched without incident through the streets of Selma until reaching the Edmund Pettus Bridge where they were brutally attacked by state troopers and mounted patrolmen.

The incident was captured on film by television cameramen, and “Bloody Sunday,” as it came to be known, helped stimulate nationwide support for the passage of voting rights legislation.

Undeterred by the threat of violence, Martin Luther King Jr. led more than three thousand marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge only two weeks later.

From there, King’s group made the 54-mile journey to the state capital under the protection of the recently federalized Alabama National Guard, arriving in Montgomery four days later.

Numerous archival collections and reference resources featuring the Selma-Montgomery March are available to view in the Civil Rights Digital Library, and can be accessed at http://crdl.usg.edu/events/selma_montgomery_march/

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North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive

2015 March 3

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the availability of a new online resource: The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive.

http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ngnewspapers

Taken from the Gainesville News, December 1, 1915

The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive provides online access to six newspaper titles published in three north Georgia cities (Dalton, Gainesville, and Rome) from 1850 to 1922. Consisting of over 33,000 newspaper pages, the archive provides historical images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date. The site is compatible with all current browsers and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads.

The archive includes the following north Georgia newspaper titles: Gainesville News (1902-1922), Georgia Cracker (Gainesville) (1894-1902), North Georgia Citizen (Dalton) (1868-1921), Rome Courier (1850-1855), Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (1860-1880), Rome Weekly Courier (1860-1878). The Digital Library of Georgia will add additional titles from the region over time.

The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia, as part of the Georgia HomePLACE initiative. The Digital Library of Georgia is a project of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia. Georgia HomePLACE is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Other newspaper archives available through the Digital Library of Georgia include the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive (1847-1922), the Macon Telegraph Archive (1826-1908), the Savannah Historic Newspapers Archive (1809-1880), the Athens Historic Newspapers Archive (1827-1928), the South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive (1845-1922), the Columbus Enquirer Archive (1828-1890), the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive (1808-1920), the Southern  Israelite Archive (1929-1986), the Red and Black Archive (1893-2006), and the Mercer Cluster Archive (1920-1970). These archives can be accessed at ​http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/MediaTypes/Newspapers.html

 

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