As We Hit 2 Million Digitized Pages, Here are Five Staff Favorites

Five favorite newspaper pages of our last 2 million digitized by Digital Library of Georgia as selected by staff members Donnie Summerlin and Daniel Britt

Macon Telegraph, November 1, 1826

This is the first newspaper page I digitized when I began work fourteen years ago at the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG). The Macon Telegraph is the third oldest continuously published newspaper in the state and has a rich history of news coverage in middle Georgia. I particularly love the typeface used in the masthead on this first issue of the paper. I don’t believe I’ve ever seen it used in any of the other eight hundred newspaper titles we’ve published. –Donnie Summerlin

Macon Telegraph, November 1, 1826, page 1

Louisville Gazette, January 14, 1800

As a staff member for the Georgia Newspaper Project, I had an opportunity to view bound volumes of the Louisville Gazette, and this page caught my eye because of the extra-bold columns. It was then that I learned historic newspapers used bold columns when reporting the death of prominent American figures, in this case, George Washington. Georgia’s late-18th and early-19th century newspapers fascinate me. They add a certain gravity to the state’s history, and to have a paper from Georgia’s first state capital is immensely cool. — Daniel Britt

Louisville Gazette, January 14, 1800, page 1

Flagpole, March 30, 1988

For over a century, cartoons have been a popular feature in Georgia newspapers. This uncredited cartoon from the March 30, 1988 issue of the Flagpole is one of my favorites. The Flagpole is an alternative newspaper that self-identifies as the “Colorbearer of Athens.” The paper is treasured by those that follow the college town’s famed music scene that has included such acts as the B-52s, R. E. M., Pylon, Neutral Milk Hotel, the Drive-By Truckers, and dozens of others. Music lovers will also appreciate that this issue also includes an interview with the beloved college band Let’s Active from Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and an ad for Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers, scheduled to play at the University of Georgia’s Legion Field. –Donnie Summerlin

Flagpole, March 30, 1988, page 12

Forsyth County News, February 15, 2004

As a fan of the Beatles, I love this story about how Forsyth County resident Paul Drew introduced the Beatles before their only concert in Atlanta in 1965. Drew was the WQXI musical director in Atlanta and struck up a decades-long relationship with the Fab Four. The story printed in the Forsyth County News includes several photos of the Beatles you won’t find published anywhere else. –Donnie Summerlin

Forsyth County News, February 15, 2004, page 8

The Great Kennesaw Route Gazette, June 1, 1886

Of all the historic newspapers I have microfilmed and helped digitize, The Great Kennesaw Route Gazette’s masthead is among one of the most ornate; it’s was extremely rare for a newspaper publisher to spare no expense for such typography. The paper circulated at each of the Western and Atlantic Railroad’s twenty-two stops, and carried editorials that set it apart from all other railroad papers. When I’m feeling particularly imaginative, I like to think about what it was like to flip through the paper while waiting for my northward or southward train. — Daniel Britt

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Issues of the Georgia Bulletin, the weekly newspaper of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta, are now available freely online on the Georgia Historic Newspapers website

ATHENS, Ga. — In conjunction with our partners at the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta, the Georgia Bulletin (1963-1980) is now available for viewing at the Georgia Historic Newspapers website. These newspapers will contribute to a broader scholarship about Catholicism in Atlanta as well as in Georgia. The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive website provides access to these newspapers, enabling full-text searching and browsing by date and title. The site is compatible with all current browsers and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. The archive is free and open for public use. 

In the first issue of the Georgia Bulletin, published January 4, 1963, Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan, the first archbishop for the newly elevated Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta, remarked:

“The religious press is not intended to be a ‘house organ’ or a ‘trade sheet.’ Its whole reason for being is that it might enter the community bearing light and courage—light enough to expose society’s ills as well as its strengths; courage enough to inspire justice and charity in those who might falter along the path.”

Angelique M. Richardson, the director of archives and records for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta emphasizes: “By making these digitized issues of our diocesan newspaper available to the public through the Georgia Historic Newspapers Project, we greatly hope that these words inspire researchers to learn more about the history of Catholics in North Georgia.”

She adds: “We would never have been able to accomplish a project like this on our own.”

Featured images:

Title: Georgia Bulletin (Atlanta), June 27, 1963, Page 1
Description: This issue, dated June 27, 1963, commemorating the coronation of Pope Paul VI, who would be crowned three days later on June 30. Pope Paul VI served as the head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from June 21, 1963, to his death on August 6, 1978. Pope Paul VI was the last pope to be crowned.
Title: Georgia Bulletin (Atlanta), May 28, 1964, Page 1
Description: Dated May 28, 1964, this issue of the Georgia Bulletin announces the establishment of three new parishes in the Atlanta area, which include the Parish of the Church of the Holy Spirit, the Parish of the Church of the Holy Cross, and the Parish of St. Mark’s.

About the Georgia Bulletin

To fight Catholic prejudice and resist the spread of false information regarding Catholic beliefs and history, the Catholic Laymen’s Association (CLA) of Georgia was founded in 1916. 

The CLA published pamphlets that explained Catholic beliefs for several years and before establishing the Bulletin of the Catholic Laymen’s Association of Georgia, in January of 1920. The Bulletin ran as a monthly newspaper out of Augusta until 1956 when the organization changed the name to the Bulletin of the Catholic Laymen’s Association of Georgia, Official Newspaper for the Diocese of Savannah & Atlanta; this change coming after the diocese divided into two regions, Atlanta and Savannah. 

For a few months in early 1958, the Diocese of Savannah published the Savannah Bulletin, before the Bulletin began circulating two editions for Savannah and Atlanta through 1962. In 1963, the publication split into two separate diocesan papers, the Georgia Bulletin (Archdiocese of Atlanta) and the Southern Cross (Diocese of Savannah). The CLA disbanded in 1962, but the Georgia Bulletin continues publication as the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Atlanta.

About the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta

The Archdiocese of Atlanta encompasses the northern half of Georgia covering 21,445 square miles. Specifically, it includes the 69 counties north of and including the following counties: Lincoln, McDuffie, Warren, Hancock, Baldwin, Putnam, Jasper, Monroe, Upson, Meriwether, and Troup. The Archdiocese of Atlanta is a vibrant, diverse, and rapidly growing Catholic community.  

As of 2020, there are 102 parishes and missions, 293 diocesan and religious priests, 46 seminarians, 66 women religious, 18 archdiocesan Catholic schools, 1.2 million Catholics, and 7.5 million people in north-central Georgia. 

The history of the Archdiocese goes back to the late 1700s. Originally part of the Diocese of Savannah, Atlanta was made a diocese in 1956 and made an archdiocese in 1962. 

The Province of Atlanta is comprised of five dioceses. Visit archatl.com.

About the Digital Library of Georgia

Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia is a GALILEO initiative that collaborates with Georgia’s libraries, archives, museums, and other institutions of education and culture to provide access to key information resources on Georgia history, culture, and life. 

This primary mission is accomplished through the ongoing development, maintenance, and preservation of digital collections and online digital library resources. DLG also serves as Georgia’s service hub for the Digital Public Library of America and as the home of the Georgia Newspaper Project, the state’s historic newspaper microfilming project. 

Visit the DLG at dlg.usg.edu.

Facebook: http://facebook.com/DigitalLibraryofGeorgia/ 

Twitter: @DigLibGA

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