Augusta Homes

CNBC recently ranked Augusta, Georgia the nation’s #1 city in which to buy a starter home. In case you are interested in moving to the Garden City, here is a look at some of Augusta’s historic homes (Sorry, they aren’t really for sale):

Circa 1900 postcard of Meadow Garden, home of Georgia Governor, United States Senator and Declaration of Independence signer George Walton. Walton lived in the house from 1792 until his death in 1804. The home still stands in Augusta as a museum. Found in Picturing Augusta: Historic Postcards from the Collection of the East Central Georgia Regional Library.

Photograph of the Ware-Sibley-Clarke House from April 1966. The home was originally built for Augusta Mayor Nicholas Ware in 1818. It today serves as the home of the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. The home is sometimes referred to as Ware’s Folly because of the high cost of its construction. Found in Owens Library’s Historic Architecture and Landscapes Collection.

Image of Terrett Cottage circa 1909. It served as the winter home of President William H. Taft. After his election to the presidency in 1908, Taft and his family spent Christmas in Augusta (prior to moving into the White House). During his stay, the president-elect played golf  at the nearby Augusta Country Club. Found in the Vanishing Georgia Collection.

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Lamar Dodd (1909-1996)

Courtesy of LaGrange College

Today would be the 101st birthday of Georgia artist Lamar Dodd. He was born September 22, 1906 in Fairburn and raised in LaGrange, Georgia. The New Georgia Encyclopedia provides an overview of his life and artistic career. You can also find his birthday marked on “This Day in Georgia History” at the GeorgiaInfo site.

Carnival at Night (1939), Courtesy of Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange College

Dodd left Georgia as a youth to study in New York, but would return and take a position with the University of Georgia (UGA). He would eventually lead the art department at UGA from 1938 until 1973. In 1996, the art school was renamed the “Lamar Dodd School of Art” in his honor (a more in depth account of his work with the art school can be found here). The Lamar Dodd Art Center, part of LaGrange College, is also named in his honor.

A photograph¬† of his childhood home in LaGrange can be found in the Troup County Digital Archives Project Photograph Database and in the Hubert Bond Owens and John Linley Image Collections at the Owens Library. And finally, you can read about Lamar Dodd in Thomas Reed’s The History of the University of Georgia (Chapter 16). A manuscript page of the chapter titled “Department of Art, Lamar Dodd” is viewable through an online collection from the Hargrett Library at UGA.

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