New landing page and poster for Georgia K-12 GSE standards on the New South and Leo Frank

Page from a letter (on page 7 of the item) where Leo Frank’s attorney Herbert J. Haas advises Lucille Frank not to use Yiddish on a postcard that could be seen in the open, for fear of an antisemitic reaction.

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) has just developed a new educator resource page about the Leo Frank case, one of Georgia’s most notorious and highly publicized legal cases that ended in Frank’s kidnapping and lynching on August 17, 1915.

These resources has been chosen as part of the Georgia K-12 social studies standard SS8H7d:
Identify the ways individuals, groups, and events attempted to shape the New South (d). Examine antisemitism and the resistance to racial equality exemplified in the Leo Frank case.

Leo Max Frank (1884-1915), supervisor at the National Pencil Factory in Atlanta, was convicted for the 1913 murder of Mary Phagan, a thirteen-year-old child laborer who traveled into town from Marietta. Frank was sentenced to death after a highly sensationalized trial and appeals process that were gripped by mob violence in Georgia, much of which was heightened by sensational news coverage.

The Frank case and its extrajudicial aftermath led to both the twentieth-century reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan and the establishment of the Anti-Defamation League.

The landing page brings together:

  • Resources documenting one of Georgia’s most significant twentieth-century events marked by intense social, cultural, political, geographic, and economic tensions.
  • A broad range of archival materials, digitized historic newspapers, digital exhibits, and scholarship documenting one of Georgia’s most significant twentieth-century events marked by intense social, cultural, political, geographic, and economic tensions that highlight the injustices of the case and underscore the real-life impact of antisemitism, violence, and other forms of hatred.
    • Digitized archival materials and family papers of Leo Frank and his attorneys document the persistent advocacy of the Atlanta and worldwide Jewish communities that supported Frank against the hatred he and his defenders faced, at significant personal risk, as well as the prevalent antisemitism in the legal system, law enforcement, popular culture, and the press.
  • The newest collection of digitized materials on Leo Frank comes from the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum and documents the cultural, political, social, geographic, and economic diversity of Georgia and the cultural struggle between Jews and non-Jews, highlight the social tensions of the early 1900s in Georgia, and emphasize the political strife experienced by those who stood up for Leo Frank’s innocence.
  • A new article in the New Georgia Encyclopedia about the Atlanta Georgian illustrates how the Leo Frank case drew national attention, thanks in no small part to reporting in newspapers like the Hearst-owned Atlanta Georgian, which sensationalized the story daily with dramatic headlines and photos between 1913 and 1915, and Tom Watson’s newspaper the Jeffersonian, that polarized Americans, all the while producing controversial and historically significant examples of yellow journalism in United States history.
  • Educator resource poster SS8H7d, featuring:
    • Image provided by: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
    • Rights: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/about/#rights
    • Accessibility: This resource is in the public domain, designed to fit an 8.5” x 11” letter-sized sheet of paper. All content is in the public domain to ensure print accessibility for all students and educators.

#LeoFrank #EducatorsofGeorgia #GeorgiaSocialStudies #GeorgiaHistory

You can view the landing page at https://sites.google.com/view/dlg-educator-resources/home/special-events/leo-frank.

The educator resource poster for the GSE SSH87d New South/Leo Frank module is available here:

Educator resource pages for other Georgia social studies standards are available here: https://sites.google.com/view/dlg-educator-resources .

#LeoFrank #EducatorsofGeorgia #GeorgiaSocialStudies #GeorgiaHistory

Educator Resource poster SS8H7d, featuring:
Image provided by: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Rights: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/about/#rights
Accessibility: This resource is in the public domain, designed to fit an 8.5” x 11” letter-sized sheet of paper. All content is in the public domain to ensure print accessibility for all students and educators.
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City records showing the 20th-century growth of Sugar Hill, Georgia now available online in the Digital Library of Georgia

ATHENS, Ga.,  June 13, 2023 Selected by statewide cultural heritage stakeholders and funded by the DLG’s competitive digitization grant program, this collection is the City of Sugar Hill’s latest collaboration with the DLG and is available here: City Government Records.

The collection includes city council minutes, ordinances, resolutions, communications, economic studies, and other information ranging from the date the city was incorporated by the Georgia General Assembly (March 24, 1939) through the year June 1992. 

The digitized collection was also funded in part by a 2022 Georgia Historical Records Advisory Council (GHRAC) grant award administered to local historical repositories to develop and/or implement projects that identify, preserve, and provide access to historical records. Funding was made possible thanks to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) and the Georgia Historical Records Advisory Council (GHRAC).

These documents, which in their original form were stored in the City Archives room in file cabinets for years and with limited access, are now available for researchers interested in the diverse issues addressed through its many ordinances.  The information in the records ranges from what types of businesses were allowed to operate in the city limits to rules guiding the resident’s property rights.  It also includes records related to the city’s handling of property annexations, salary information for city government officials and staff, and rate/fee comparisons on utility rates (water, sewer, gas, sanitation) in the nearby localities.  In addition,  data that reflects the state’s cultural, political, social, geographic, and economic diversity provides a broader view of the community’s growth over the decades. 

Brandon S. Hembree, Mayor of the City of Sugar Hill, notes:

“The Sugar Hill Historic Preservation Society was created by the City of Sugar Hill in 2015 with the mission of expanding the community’s awareness and appreciation for Sugar Hill’s past. The City celebrated its 84th birthday on March 24, 2023. We have a rich history and, as the current Mayor, I often view these City Council ledgers for information about our past and inspiration for our future as a community.”

[View the entire collection online]

 

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About the City of Sugar Hill

The Sugar Hill Historic Preservation Society meets on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 7 pm. All meetings are held in the History Museum Room at Sugar Hill City Hall. You can find out more at: https://cityofsugarhill.com/government/boards-commissions/historic-preservation-society/.

 

Selected images from the collection: 

 

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of Sugar Hill Historic Preservation Society (Sugar Hill, Ga.)

Sugar Hill, Georgia city council minutes, December 22, 1948-December 3, 1964

Title : Sugar Hill, Georgia city council minutes, December 22, 1948-December 3, 1964.https://dlg.usg.edu/record/shgapc_cgr_144 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of Sugar Hill Historic Preservation Society (Sugar Hill, Ga.)

Title : Sugar Hill, Georgia city council minutes, January 7, 1965-December 20, 1975

https://dlg.usg.edu/record/shgapc_cgr_145 

 

 

 

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