Family Papers Documenting The Lives Of Enslaved People In Liberty County, Georgia, Dating Back To The 1700s, Are Now Available Online.

Black and white photograph of a young African American boy standing next to a cow in a fenced pasture.
Julia King Collection – boy with cow  https://dlg.usg.edu/record/midm_jkic_682

 

 

In partnership with the Midway Museum, the Digital Library of Georgia has just made the Julia R. King Collection available online.

King (1863–1952) was a descendant of the Roswell King (1765–1844) family of Georgia plantation owners and managers who owned land, property, and enslaved people across Georgia dating back to the 1700s. 

The collection includes essential documents related to slavery, including estate appraisals and inventories that include the first names of enslaved African Americans. It will be of particular interest to those doing family research on people enslaved in Liberty County, Georgia.

Stacy Ashmore Cole, the creator of “TheyHadNames.net: African Americans in Early Liberty County Records, secretary of the Midway Museum Board of Governors, and president of the Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society, describes the importance of these records.

“The Midway Museum’s Julia R. King Collection contains essential references to enslaved people unavailable elsewhere. 

These documents will interest them and others who have not yet discovered their ancestry. 

The study of these enslaver families, including the Kings, is critical to Liberty County African American genealogical and historical research. 

They had a long tradition of keeping enslaved people within their families through inheritance, lending, and gifting, including down the white female lines. Because of this, the only way to trace a particular enslaved person is often through probate and enslaving family documents. 

The small size of the collection and its relative geographical remoteness have made it difficult for academic researchers to prioritize. The Midway Museum is also in an area vulnerable to hurricanes. 

Digitization ensures that we preserve these materials and make them easily accessible for future generations.”

View the entire collection online

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About the Midway Museum

Since its founding, the Midway Museum has been supported by the descendants of the Midway Church members, who have provided 18th- and 19th-century family heirlooms, documents, books, genealogical lineages, and heirloom furnishings, paintings, and artifacts. Many Midway Church descendants still live in Liberty County and coastal Georgia, serve on the Board of Governors, and visit during the Midway Church’s annual Homecoming. Visit themidwaymuseum.org/ 

About the Digital Library of Georgia

The Digital Library of Georgia is an award-winning GALILEO initiative housed at the University of Georgia Libraries. With the state’s cultural heritage organizations, the DLG shares Georgia’s history online for free through its websites. The project supports its partner organizations by offering free and low-cost services. The DLG also serves as Georgia’s service hub for the Digital Public Library of America and as the home of the Georgia Newspaper Project, the state’s historic newspaper preservation project. 

Visit our website at dlg.usg.edu
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Selected images from the collection: 

Image courtesy of Midway Museum

Title : Julia King Collection – Man with Hands.

https://dlg.usg.edu/record/midm_jkic_704 

 

Image courtesy of Midway Museum

Title : Exchange of Slaves between Mary Maxwell and Julia R. King, 1842.

https://dlg.usg.edu/record/midm_jkic_282-53

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Black History Month 2022 Begins Today

February 1 marks the beginning of Black History Month, founded by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who also established the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH).

He originally envisioned “Negro History Week” during the second week of February because it included the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass who were both prominent symbols of American freedom.

2022’s theme is Black Health and Wellness. The Digital Library of Georgia has many items related to that topic, available at bit.ly/bhmdlg22 for you to explore.

You can read more about 2022’s Black History Month theme, and the themes of previous years here at the ASALH website. If you are a resident of Georgia and want to reach out to your local ASALH branch, the information is available here. Local ASALH chapters generate a remarkable amount of excellent African American history and cultural programming throughout the year.

From our partners at Clark Atlanta University and the Atlanta University Center Robert W Woodruff Library, here is a photograph of African American women in a nursing class, circa 1900, which took place at Atlanta University.

Title: Women in Class, circa 1900
Holding Institution: Clark Atlanta University
https://dlg.usg.edu/record/auu_auc-001_0923

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