The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is Now Available

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the availability of a new online resource: The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive

http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/sgnewspapers

The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive provides online access to six newspaper titles published in four south Georgia cities (Albany, Americus, Thomasville, and Valdosta) from 1845 to 1922. Consisting of over 81,000 newspaper pages, the archive provides historical images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date.

The archive includes the following south Georgia newspaper titles: the Albany News (1870-1883), the Albany Patriot (1845-1866), the Americus Times Recorder (1881-1921), the Sumter Republican (1870-1885), the Thomasville Times Enterprise (1873-1922), and the Valdosta Times (1908-1912). The Digital Library of Georgia will add additional titles from the region over time.

The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia as part of the Georgia HomePLACE initiative. The project is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Other newspaper archives available through the Digital Library of Georgia include the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive (1847-1922), the Macon Telegraph Archive (1826-1908), the Athens Historic Newspapers Archive (1827-1922), the Columbus Enquirer Archive (1828-1890), the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive (1808-1920), the Southern Israelite Archive (1929-1986), and the Red and Black Archive (1893-2006). These archives can be accessed at http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/MediaTypes/Newspapers.html

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Before They Were Famous

Long before they gained national fame for their accomplishments, these Georgians were largely unknown members of society, waiting to take their place in history. Take a small peek into their lives back when they weren’t so well known:

Sidney Lanier gained attention in the late 19th century for writings and poetry about his home state. The photograph below from the Vanishing Georgia Collection captures him as a 15 year old boy in Macon, Georgia. In the years that followed, he graduated from Oglethorpe University and served in the Civil War before embarking on a successful writing career. As a result of this success, he would eventually have a lake, a bridge, and even a county named in his honor in Georgia.

Silent film actor Oliver Hardy spent most of his youth in Milledgeville, Georgia where his mother ran a hotel and he worked at a movie theater. The newspaper clipping below from the Jul. 21, 1908 issue of the Milledgeville Union Recorder lists him as a first basemen in a Married versus Singles baseball game. Note the roster refers to him as “Fatty,” which was one of his childhood nicknames. He eventually left Georgia for a movie career in California and became one of the most recognizable actors in the history of American film.

Although not completely unknown in 1963, this image of Jimmy Carter during his early days as a state legislator bears no hint that the “Farmer & Warehouseman” from Plains, Georgia would one day become the president of the United States (by anthony at dress-head ). The image is from a picture book of state legislators in the Georgia Government Publications site.

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