The state of Georgia’s environment 2009

In 1948, a visitor to the southern Appalachian mountains in north Georgia could see an average of 93 miles. By 1990, due to air pollution, that distance had dropped to an average of 22 miles.”

Visibility levels at Cohutta, GA.

The above quote comes from page seventy-four of a report titled The State of Georgia’s Environment 2009. It is accompanied on that same page by the image you see here. The left half of this image represents a baseline visibility from the combined years of 2000 to 2004. The right half of this image represents the projected visibility in 2016 of the same scene (presuming the beneficial effects of state and federal efforts to reduce pollution). These images were created by a computer simulation of air pollution levels and included in the report of the Environmental Protection Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

The Georgia Government Publications (GGP) site provides users access to a staggering amount of current information about the Peach State, information that will be findable long after it has disappeared from a government web page. I was actually searching the GGP for documents related to “oil” when I came across this series of environmental reports. It felt serendipitous, and a bit startling as the images reminded me that there are people literally “looking out” for us.

Even a quick scan of the report left me feeling smarter about the state in which I live. Think what an hour with this information could do for you?

Visibility level at Cohutta, GA.

I’ll leave you with a final image: the same scene as projected in 2064 (distant, but hopeful).

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Welcome to the DLG B

a balloon ascension
A balloon ascension: from the Vanishing Georgia Collection, courtesy of the Georgia Archives

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is excited to unveil its own blog. With over two hundred collections from sixty institutions, an ever increasing archive of historic Georgia newspapers, a public domain repository of government publications, and the ground breaking Civil Rights Digital Library, the DLG is large, diverse and truthfully a bit difficult to “grasp.”

The DLG B attempts to increase the visibility of these valuable materials from Georgia’s past, while also calling deserved attention to the institutions responsible for preserving  them. A resource of this scope could not exist without the long term collaboration of state government, universities, archives, museums and public libraries (and the people powering them, of course).

We hope to introduce the student, the scholar, and the simply curious to the profound and the familiar-but-perhaps-forgotten. We also plan to keep you updated on new projects at the DLG, and to let you know when new resources are available.

So – if you’d please – add us to your rss feed; share our posts when you’re inclined (yup, just click the “share” button right down there); visit us at our Facebook page; keep one eye out for us on twitter;  and we promise to bring you the DLG that you have rarely seen.

The DLG is an initiative of GALILEO.

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