North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the availability of a new online resource: The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive.

http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ngnewspapers

Taken from the Gainesville News, December 1, 1915

The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive provides online access to six newspaper titles published in three north Georgia cities (Dalton, Gainesville, and Rome) from 1850 to 1922. Consisting of over 33,000 newspaper pages, the archive provides historical images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date. The site is compatible with all current browsers and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads.

The archive includes the following north Georgia newspaper titles: Gainesville News (1902-1922), Georgia Cracker (Gainesville) (1894-1902), North Georgia Citizen (Dalton) (1868-1921), Rome Courier (1850-1855), Rome Tri-Weekly Courier (1860-1880), Rome Weekly Courier (1860-1878). The Digital Library of Georgia will add additional titles from the region over time.

The North Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia, as part of the Georgia HomePLACE initiative. The Digital Library of Georgia is a project of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia. Georgia HomePLACE is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Other newspaper archives available through the Digital Library of Georgia include the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive (1847-1922), the Macon Telegraph Archive (1826-1908), the Savannah Historic Newspapers Archive (1809-1880), the Athens Historic Newspapers Archive (1827-1928), the South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive (1845-1922), the Columbus Enquirer Archive (1828-1890), the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive (1808-1920), the Southern  Israelite Archive (1929-1986), the Red and Black Archive (1893-2006), and the Mercer Cluster Archive (1920-1970). These archives can be accessed at ​http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/MediaTypes/Newspapers.html

 

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I want to ride my bicycle

Jesse Mercer Archer, Hancock County, Georgia, between 1895 and 1900

I recently purchased a bicycle. While it lacks the nifty bell possessed by this dapper gentleman’s bike (as pictured on the left), it does otherwise appear little changed to the casual eye. The larger difference by far is found in the rider, and I will not anytime soon be seen on, or even posing by, my new bike in a suit, tie and hat.

Style is a sacrifice, particularly if you insist upon it crossing boundaries. Living in Athens, Georgia, one sees spandex clad bikers at all times and places. Below are photographs of  a time when riders eschewed hyper-specific sports wear for the dignified clothes of their daily lives.

The DLG – and more specifically the Vanishing Georgia collection – has many historical photographs of bicycles, bike riders and even bike shops. Take a look.

Cook and Gentry Bicycle Shop, Rome, Floyd County, Georgia, ca. 1897
Group on bicycles, not after 1904
Florence Timmerman with a new bicycle, Lanier County, Georgia
Man on tricycle, Cedartown, Polk County, Georgia, ca. 1895
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